Wires Crossed #83 - May 11

Wires Crossed #83 - May 11

Speed Camera App From TomTom
TomTom might have found a way for users to detect speed cameras by revealing its speed camera alert app. Currently, it is only available in the UK, and there is no mention of it being available here. However, back in the day, it was easy for customs to look out for a physical unit and accordingly confiscate it. But if it’s an app on your iPhone, how will they police that? Not too sure if it would work over here as we have yet to sight it, and we're unsure about the frequency technology it would use to detect the cameras. But it certainly piqued our interest.

Facebook Outing After Old Phone Used To Post On Wall
Just goes to show you must delete, delete, delete when upgrading your new technology and getting rid of your old, as Denver resident Rich Dewberry found out recently. The Colorado native decided to trade in his old phone at retailer Best Buy. All went well, until he got home and found a message on his Facebook page that he had allegedly written saying he was coming out as being gay. Turns out he didn’t log out of his Facebook app from his old phone and somebody at Best Buy was having a laugh at his expense. However, he claims Best Buy didn’t see the funny side and sacked the employee. Didn’t turn out well for all concerned.

FBI Wants Google And Facebook To Spy On Its Behalf
US Federal law enforcement agency the FBI is said to want Google, Facebook and a gaggle of other Internet companies to provide a backdoor whereby it can wiretap suspects in cases it is covering. This would be about as welcome as a bit torrent site at a web awards ceremony with internet freedom groups more likely than not to be up in arms. We find it hard to believe that anybody would be surprised by this. The police and the justice departments in most western countries would be idiots not to take advantage of the technology – after all cybercrims don’t have any such qualms.

Twitter Says No To  Handing Over Data
And in a related matter to the last article, it seems Twitter has grown a spine with regard to handing over information to government agencies. Prosecutors in New York are asking for the emails and tweets of one Malcolm Harris, who was arrested during the Occupy Wall St protests in 2011. Twitter has responded by saying that the New York State Court need a search warrant to access the information. To the American Civil Liberties Union this is a constitutional rights issue. It will be interesting to see how the courts see the issue.

 

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